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Profile photo of George H. Williams

Making the Digital Humanities Accessible: A Session Idea + A Survey

I read with interest James Neal’s post entitled “An honest and open discussion regarding diversity in the digital humanities?” I believe that discussion would be a welcome addition to the unconference schedule. Along these lines, I’d like to help organize a session about disability and accessibility, either as part of James’ session or in addition to it. Having talked about this topic with many people in the DH community over the last couple of years, I’m confident that we can start making some easy-to-use tools that will improve accessibility for endusers and simplify for creators the task(s) of making accessible resources.

Furthermore, my collaborators and I are currently gathering information about issues of disability, accessibility, and digital humanities resources. As part of that effort, we invite you to complete this survey. (It should take less than 5 minutes.) We will use the information we gather to inform our future project plans, and I can also share the results at the upcoming THATCamp. As a survey participant you may remain anonymous, or you may share your name, affiliation, and contact information at the bottom of the form.

4 comments

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  1. Profile photo of tcarmody
    tcarmody

    Excited about this proposal — although you already knew that. :-)

    Co-sign.

  2. Profile photo of Craig Bellamy
    Craig Bellamy

    Accessibilty is a big issus and should be a part of our tool box of standards. I will try and dig up a report on their use in produced by UK’s JISC and post it here before the event

  3. Profile photo of George H. Williams
    George H. Williams

    Great! Glad to hear from others who are also interested in this topic.

  4. Profile photo of Brian Croxall
    Brian Croxall

    This is an issue that I’m interested in simply because I know that I know so little about it, apart from alt tags. I’m curious to know what sorts of tools you’re envisioning that go beyond the ones that you’ve been covering recently in ProfHacker.

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